Yes, I’m repeating myself: women are people, too. How about the people in the gun industry treat them like they are?

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I’ve written about this before, but it’s getting worse. All across this country are people standing behind gun counters who need to be taught that women are people, too.

I’ve lost track of the number of times I’ve run into a woman who was sold (as opposed to deciding to buy) a revolver for self defense. Now it should be pretty clear to even the densest web denizen that this is a revolver-friendly blog, so it should not come as a shock that I think revolvers are a great tool.

They are not necessarily, however, the right tool. As I mentioned last week, the revolver is the easiest gun in the world to shoot, but the most difficult gun to shoot well. That long, heavy (in stock configuration) trigger requires a certain amount of hand strength, without which the gun cannot be fired.

Herein lies the problem: the female of the species, in general, tends to have less strength in her digits than does the male. It’s not unusual, therefore, to find a woman saddled with a brand-new revolver on which she cannot manipulate the trigger. I’ve seen countless numbers of women who actually have to use two fingers to get the trigger moving!

It’s not so much a matter of gun fit (though that enters into the equation far too often), but simply the trigger offering more resistance than a slim finger is capable of overcoming. In reality most women would really be better served with the shorter, lighter trigger action of an autoloading pistol, but the wisdom of the gunstore commando is that autoloaders are just “too complicated for the little lady.”

Hey, Bubba, I’ve got news for you: women actually drive cars these days! Yes, automobiles, with their myriad switches and levers and pedals and buttons. Women have no problem figuring those things out, yet you think they can’t handle the concept of a slide stop lever?

The usual rejoinder is that women don’t have the upper body strength to manipulate the slide of an autoloader. This is fact turned on it’s side to bolster a flawed assumption; yes, women tend not to have our arm strength, but that deficiency can be rendered immaterial through proper technique. It’s a simple matter, and nearly any female (and a more enlightened male) firearms instructor can teach it inside of thirty seconds.

This whole issue wouldn’t bother me so much – and I wouldn’t be writing about it again – but the inferiority attitude is so pervasive that some women are themselves buying into the notion that they’re not “capable” of handling an autoloader. I’ve actually had students to whom I’ve taught the autoloader manipulation techniques (and who’ve shot very well with one) go out and end up with a revolver. Not because they wanted one, mind you, but because some dolt behind a counter convinced her that it was all she could handle.

Mind you, I’m not some new-age “sensitive man”. I’m as big a neanderthal as the next guy; I believe that women and men are different, and you can thank your favorite deity for the difference! I’m just tired of people assuming that my wife, sisters, nieces, and mother are so stupid that they can’t handle a simple mechanical device. I’m annoyed that they are doing their level best to indoctrinate women to this nonsensical point of view, and I’m appalled that it actually seems to be gaining some traction among women themselves!

I don’t have a prescription for this problem, other than to continue to educate every person – man or woman – I run across. If that means I repeat myself every so often, I’m willing to do so. I hope you’ll forgive me!

Yes, revolvers are wonderful, but they’re not for everyone. We need to help people to make intelligent decisions, and if that means they choose a self-shucker, so be it. Heretical? No, just realistic.

-=[ Grant ]=-

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About the Author:

Grant Cunningham is a renowned author and teacher in the fields of self defense, defensive shooting education and personal safety. He’s written several popular books on handguns and defensive shooting, including "The Book of the Revolver", "Shooter’s Guide To Handguns", "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals", "Defensive Pistol Fundamentals", and "Practice Strategies for Defensive Shooting" (Fall 2015.) Grant has also written articles on shooting, self defense, training and teaching for many magazines and shooting websites, including Concealed Carry Magazine, Gun Digest Magazine, the Association of Defensive Shooting Instructors ADSI) and the popular Personal Defense Network training website. He’s produced a DVD in the National Rifle Association’s Personal Firearm Defense series titled "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals" and teaches defensive shooting and personal safety courses all over the United States.
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