Is the Ruger GP100 inaccurate?

Is the Ruger GP100 inaccurate?

It sometimes amuses me how often one hears the same question, with only slight variations. One that I’ve heard over the years goes something like this: “Is it true that the GP100 isn’t very accurate?” Personally, I’ve not noticed that any of mine are, but there is more to this story.

Assuming that the gun is “in spec” with regards to its construction (forcing cone, crown, chamber/barrel alignment, etc.) it should shoot quite well. Many GP owners, however, continue to complain about the accuracy of their individual example in the absence of those identifiable deficiencies. It so happens that there is a design defect in certain models of the GP100 that will definitely reduce the precision of the gun: the sights.

Owners of fixed-sight Rugers are generally much happier with the accuracy of the GP than those who have the adjustable sights, and I can’t say I blame them. The first problem is Ruger’s rear sight: it stinks, to put it bluntly. Don’t get me wrong, the rear sight picture isn’t bad (in fact I prefer it to Smith & Wesson’s); the problem is that the Ruger rear sight often won’t hold zero all that well.

It starts with a body which has a very loose fit in the frame’s sight channel. It continues with universally sloppy fit on the sight pivot pin – the pin that holds the sight onto the gun, allowing the body to pivot up and down for elevation changes. The elevation screw, likewise, has a lot of “wiggle” in it, and the windage screw is often not any better. The net result is a sight that can’t be relied upon to stay where it’s set from shot to shot.

The rear sight isn’t the only problem, just the biggest one. The interchangeable front sight often shows deficiencies of it’s own. It is investment cast (like the rest of the gun), but without subsequent machining the edges and serrations remain quite indistinct. The sight picture isn’t all that crisp, making a sure hold on target a bit like driving a well-worn 1951 GMC 2-1/2 ton flatbed farm truck. (For those who’ve never had the pleasure, imagine going down the street having to constantly move the steering wheel a half-turn in each direction just to maintain something like a straight line. Now try it in the rain. At night. Get the idea?)

I’ve seen more than a few front sights which also weren’t secure in the dovetails, causing them to wobble a bit, and there are quite a few that don’t have parallel sides. (Or worse, lack a straight top!)

The fixed-sight GP100 doesn’t have any of these problems, which explains why their owners tend to be more satisfied with that model’s performance.

There are solutions. The best is to replace the rear sight with the terrific Rough Country sight from Bowen Classic Arms. It fits precisely, and the opposing screws that adjust windage and elevation also serve as lockdowns for those adjustments. (If you’ve ever adjusted the rear sight on a FAL rifle, you know the concept.) The Rough Country sights have the easy change capability of an adjustable sight, but once locked down are as rugged as a fixed sight. There is nothing better on the market, period. Absolutely the best.

The Rough Country sight has a superb sight picture, and is available with a plain black blade, a white outline blade, an “express” (shallow “V”) blade, and a blank blade – so that your friendly gunsmith can provide the notch that you feel is best.

The front sight can also be replaced with a Bowen unit. The Bowen front blade is precisely made, with perfect dovetails and parallel sides. It comes as a “blank” – it must be machined to shape and height, then blued, before it is of any use. It is an expensive part, and the additional machining adds to the cost, but if you’re looking for the absolute best GP100 sight picture it is the way to go.

Outfitted with decent sights the GP100 really comes into its own, easily keeping up with the best from the competition. If you’ve not been happy with the way your GP100 shoots, take a hard look at those sights – my bet is you’ll find they aren’t terribly great!

-=[ Grant ]=-

  • Posted by Grant Cunningham
  • On June 23, 2008