Revolver grips: finger grooves or plain?

Revolver grips: finger grooves or plain?

Many people ask me where to get finger grooved grips for various guns (often for the Colt Python, but the Ruger GP-100 seems to be a common request as well.) Personally, I usually try to talk them out of that style grip, and I’d like to share my reasoning.

First, the grooves rarely fit any given person perfectly; for my hands, for instance, every grooved grip I’ve ever tried required me to spread my fingers to an uncomfortable degree. If I didn’t, my fingers would wind up on top of the separating ridges, making shooting far less comfortable and secure! Women, who often have hands that are significantly smaller than their male counterparts, are particularly sensitive to this problem.

Second, anytime you add spacing between your fingers the combined strength of your grip is reduced. You simply grip harder with your fingers together than apart. There’s a reason that hammers don’t have finger grooves!

Third, having grooves on your grips slows down your acquisition and draw. No less a personage than Jerry Miculek, in a television interview, eschewed finger groove grips. As he put it, “no one gets a perfect grip out of the holster every time.” A smooth, non-grooved grip allows you to get a workable grip immediately, where a grooved model requires that you get perfect finger placement from the outset. That is not what you want on a self-defense firearm!

I could point out that another revolver shooter who was “pretty good” was Bill Jordan, and you’ll note that the grips he designed and used don’t have finger grooves.

It’s possible that if one is accustomed to holding a revolver in a light target-shooters grip, finger grooves may help in control. (I don’t, I don’t know anyone who does, and it’s not what most trainers teach today.) Outside of that, I think they are an abomination and suggest that you not use them!

-=[ Grant ]=-

  • Posted by Grant Cunningham
  • On August 11, 2006