What I did at SHOT Show 2012, Part Three.

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One of the booths I wanted to visit was Elzetta. I’ve mentioned before that my flashlight of choice is their ZFL-M60 with a (discontinued) Malkoff MC-E module. This combination gives 500 lumens (!!) of pure flood light, enough to light up a room no matter which direction it’s pointed. The beam is so soft that it has no hotspot and thus produces no glare when pointed at anything short of a mirror. It is, I contend, the ideal personal defense light.

The Elzetta light is also incredibly tough, more so than any other light I’ve owned. Here’s a ridiculously over-the-top torture test between an Elzetta and a Surefire:

Having witnessed (and experienced) various Surefire failures, I can only say “that’s why I carry an Elzetta!” If there’s a tougher light on the market, I’d like to see it. This picture shows the light from the video (on left), along with the light that drove all the nails into the 2×4 on which it rests. Yes, it still works!

As I mentioned, the MC-E module was discontinued some time ago. This left a huge gap in the market, as there was no high quality flashlight with a flood beam available. This left me unable to wholeheartedly recommend any light when asked, as I truly feel the flood beam is a necessity in indoor environments. Turns out that Malkoff listened, and I learned that the Elzetta light can be had with the Malkoff M60F module: 235 honest lumens with a very floody beam! It’s not as pure a flood as my MC-E, but it’s better than anything else on the market and the modified beam will probably be more versatile for more people. Elzettas are made in the U.S. and come from a fanatical company that takes their products seriously. Highly recommended.

There was an entirely new line of revolvers unveiled at SHOT, from a company called Sarsilmaz out of Turkey. I talked at length with their chief engineer, Mr. Oner Ozylimaz, and he told me that they made use of forged stainless frames, barrels and cylinders, but use MIM (metal injection molding) for most everything else – including, oddly, the cylinder crane. This gives the guns a two-tone appearance, as the MIM crane is black set against the stainless of the major parts.

The guns bear a superficial resemblance to the medium-frame Taurus, but I was unable to get him to let me look inside of one. The guns are all in .38/.357, are approximately of “K/L” frame size, and have rounded butts. Barrel lengths range from approximately 3″ to 6″, with all but the shortest having LPA adjustable sights curiously mounted on a plate that’s screwed to the topstrap. The 3″-ish model had a simple drift-adjustable rear sight that I found oddly appealing. The guns are of roughly Rossi quality, both in terms of finish and action.

The guns themselves weren’t all that exciting, though if properly priced they may be a solid alternative to brands like Rossi and Charter Arms. What IS exciting is that a company outside of the U.S. decided that the revolver market was lucrative enough to justify the engineering and tooling costs (MIM molds aren’t cheap) for a new line of guns. I don’t think I’ll own a Sarsilmaz, but I’m glad they’re here!

Ithaca shotguns, if you didn’t know, are a particular favorite of mine. Their Model 37 is a classic, an icon in the shotgun world. If you’ve never handled one you should; if you’re used to Remington or (worse) Mossberg pumps, the Ithaca will make you smile the first time you operate the slide! Their actions are smooth, light, and are usually a cure for the person who has a tendency to short-stroke other pump guns.

Ithaca has gone through several owners and a couple of shutdowns over the last decade, but for the last few years has been making a comeback. Not only are they producing a full line of the traditional Model 37 in 12 and 20 gauges, this year they introduced an absolutely darling 28 gauge version – which none of their forebears, including the original Ithaca, ever did. It’s made on a special small frame, and is light and very quick-handling. Fans of the ’28’ will want one, and I’m told they’re being produced one at a time in their Custom Shop. The workmanship shows!

That’s not the only new thing: they’re now producing an over/under of their own design, which looks quite nice. (I’m not an O/U guy, it must be said, but the workmanship was solid.) They’ve also brought back an old favorite, the single shot single barrel Trap model. They’ve also spun off their home defense and police shotguns into an allied entity called Ithaca Tactical, and have quite a line of tough-looking door breachers and similar accessories to help them regain some of the police market they once dominated.

One product of Ithaca Tactical was sitting quietly on a back table but wasn’t officially introduced: the Ithaca Tactical AR-15. This was the year of the AR-15 at SHOT, as you couldn’t look in any direction without seeing some company declaring that they make the “best” AR-15 clones. The Ithaca version is at least different, being fully machined in their factory from aluminum billet instead of built on outsourced castings. Another AR is probably what the market doesn’t need, but apparently they feel they need for one if Ithaca Tactical is to compete. OK, then.

I’m very big on keeping my knives sharp, and for the last decade or so have been using the Lansky system to do so. It’s able to produce a decent edge, but I’ve never been happy with the quality of Lansky’s components. I’ve looked at other sharpeners, but have never found anything that is as quick and easy as the Lansky – until this show!

Wicked Edge is a relatively new company out of Santa Fe, and their sharpening system combines easy operation with a wide range of quality stone, ceramic, and diamond hones, along with leather strops for a really polished edge. Pharmacist Tommy had with him a knife that he’d tried (with his Lansky) to get to a decent edge, without success. The Wicked Edge had no problem handling the odd shape and size of the blade, and in a few minutes it was shaving sharp (as proven by Tommy’s suddenly smooth forearms.) He’s sold, and so am I. I’m going to order one as soon as I recover from the monetary impact of this trip!

Check back tomorrow, because there’s more to tell!

-=[ Grant ]=-

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About the Author:

Grant Cunningham is a renowned author and teacher in the fields of self defense, defensive shooting education and personal safety. He’s written several popular books on handguns and defensive shooting, including "The Book of the Revolver", "Shooter’s Guide To Handguns", "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals", "Defensive Pistol Fundamentals", and "Practice Strategies for Defensive Shooting" (Fall 2015.) Grant has also written articles on shooting, self defense, training and teaching for many magazines and shooting websites, including Concealed Carry Magazine, Gun Digest Magazine, the Association of Defensive Shooting Instructors ADSI) and the popular Personal Defense Network training website. He’s produced a DVD in the National Rifle Association’s Personal Firearm Defense series titled "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals" and teaches defensive shooting and personal safety courses all over the United States.
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