A weekend hunting trip. Well, not so much hunting as needed pest control!

Posted by:

I just returned from a short jaunt to the dry side of Oregon, visiting relatives and doing some shooting. Usually both at the same time!

The shooting part of my trip involved helping to rid my cousin’s ranches of the dreaded sage rat. Sage rats are the colloquial term for several species of small, ground-dwelling squirrels which inhabit the fields of farmers and ranchers in Eastern Oregon, Washington, and parts of Idaho. They’re incredibly damaging to crops and they breed like rabbits on a steady diet of Viagra and crack cocaine.

Sage rat hunting has become a Very Big Thing out here in the West, and despite hundreds of thousands of the things being dispatched every season the population continues to outbreed the hunters. Damage to crops from sage rat infestations is staggering and it doesn’t look like the problem is going to end any time soon.

There are a couple of schools of thought regarding the hunting of sage rats. One school likes to set up a shooting bench and snipe the things from long range with a .22-250. The other prefers to use a .22 rimfire, and just get closer. I belong to the latter group, as using a rimfire is significantly cheaper and still quite challenging. (In a good field it’s not unusual to go through 500 rounds a day, and I’m just not wealthy enough to afford to do that with a centerfire rifle!)

Another benefit of using rimfires is that it’s easy to get kids involved. It’s important that children learn early the necessity of responsible wildlife management. The reason we shoot the sage rat is because a) the population is out of control, and b) poisons aren’t an option in areas with large raptor populations. (How many of you have actually seen a bald eagle hunting prey? I saw a half-dozen just this weekend, which is the case every time I go out there. With poison, that wouldn’t be the case.)

Happiness Is A New Gun – My nephew Roman came with us on this trip, and I presented him with his first “grown-up” rifle. Up to this point he’d been using one of the little Chipmunk rifles, and it was time for him to upgrade. I gave him a Glenfield Model 25 with some special touches: I shortened the barrel to a more kid-friendly (yet legal) length, tuned the trigger just a bit to get rid of the horrendous grittiness, floated the barrel, and mounted a 3/4″-tubed scope. It turned out to be a fast handling, accurate little gun which he quickly put to good use, making some excellent shots in very challenging (windy) conditions.

Some Thoughts On Equipment – It’s normal to think that a beginner doesn’t need top notch gear on which to learn how to shoot. My nephew reinforced my belief in the opposite view: the novice is more in need of quality equipment than the experienced shooter. It’s hard to learn all the nuances of good shooting when one is fighting with substandard gear, and good quality guns and ammo don’t stand in the way of skill development. Regardless of the age of the student, If one is just starting out it’s important to buy the best equipment one can afford. It is only after the basics are mastered is one able to rise above his/her equipment, but poor equipment can keep one from truly mastering even the simplest techniques.

-=[ Grant ]=-

0

About the Author:

Grant Cunningham is a renowned author and teacher in the fields of self defense, defensive shooting education and personal safety. He’s written several popular books on handguns and defensive shooting, including "The Book of the Revolver", "Shooter’s Guide To Handguns", "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals", "Defensive Pistol Fundamentals", and "Practice Strategies for Defensive Shooting" (Fall 2015.) Grant has also written articles on shooting, self defense, training and teaching for many magazines and shooting websites, including Concealed Carry Magazine, Gun Digest Magazine, the Association of Defensive Shooting Instructors ADSI) and the popular Personal Defense Network training website. He’s produced a DVD in the National Rifle Association’s Personal Firearm Defense series titled "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals" and teaches defensive shooting and personal safety courses all over the United States.
  Related Posts
  • No related posts found.