The Wrong Woman now has a blog!

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Kelly Muir at Wrong Woman has put up a blog to discuss the unique aspects of this new self defense program. I can already tell that it isn’t going to be your average self defense blog: her third post talks about serial manipulators and the language they use.

It was a bit of an eye-opener for me. This is something men don’t normally deal with, and thus I’d never really thought about such nuances of ...

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Attitude Change, 2010 Edition: what have I changed my mind about?

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I’ve been actively interested in the topic of self defense training since the early 90s. Over the last decade, particularly in the last five years, a lot of my original opinions regarding self defense have changed. This isn’t because I’m wishy-washy and unable to hold on to an opinion (just ask my wife!) Rather, such change is brought about by being exposed to new information, or because new research alters original assumptions.

As this year winds down, I thought it might ...

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Striking a blow: empty-hand defensive techniques are important too!

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An area of defensive preparations where I’ve been quite deficient is in empty-hand techniques. I’ve been trained to shoot (obviously), to use a knife, and to use a Kubotan – but have learned precious little about using no tools other than what nature has provided.

The gun is an appropriate tool for encounters that happen beyond, say, two arm’s reach. Inside that space, however, the handgun is probably not the correct first choice. (It may come into play at some point, ...

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The Case Of The Locked-Up Rugers: learning proper trigger reset is the key to avoiding them.

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Over the years I’ve gotten a number of inquiries that sound something like this: “I was reading a forum about Rugers locking the trigger when shooting fast. What’s with that – any truth?”

This is a question that comes up often enough that I’ve actually written a boilerplate answer that I paste into my email replies. I think it’s worth discussing here.

First, the wording of the question (and the complaint that engenders the question) implies that the gun is somehow at ...

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Another independent thinker looks at traditional safety rules and agrees with me.

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Alan over at Snarkybytes wants to do away with Traditional Safety Rule #1, “all guns are always loaded” (or variants thereof.) His charts about the possible permutations of safety violations are really superb.

Welcome to the club, Alan – I’ve been saying the same thing for over three years now, and caught the same flak that you’re now getting.

The comments over at his place are very similar to the comments that I got ...

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Monday pot-stirring: how to tell when you’re being fed a line of bull.

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I’ve mentioned that my father was on a bomber crew during World War II. I didn’t mention that a few years before he died he trolled the gun shows looking for a decent M1 Garand (I eventually found one for him, which my brother and I gave to him as a birthday gift.) I asked him why he wanted one, and he animatedly exclaimed “I carried one during the War, and it was the best weapon ever made!”

“Ummm, Dad?” I ...

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Recoil and reflexes: unintended discharges with heavy-recoiling guns.

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A video of a petite woman shooting a S&W .500 Magnum made the rounds last week. At issue was an uncontrolled (negligent) discharge, occurring as a rapid “double tap.”

Watch the video, and you’ll see that as the gun recoils from the first round, a second round is ignited. The barrel is nearly vertical when the second shot fires, raising all sorts of concerns about its eventual landing place. It’s definitely an unsafe situation!

The various comments made (not ...

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What I did on my days off: I taught a class with Rob Pincus. A good time was had by all!

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I spent the weekend up at FIrearms Academy of Seattle teaching a Combat Focus Shooting class with the guy who wrote the book on it, Rob Pincus. We had one bright, sunny day (got the sunburn to prove it!) and one exceptionally wet, cold, dark day. That’s life in the Pacific Northwest!

We had a diverse group of just under 20 students, some of whom were “advanced practitioners” and some who were significantly less experienced. ...

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Book Report: Combat Focus Shooting – Evolution 2010.

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Rob Pincus’ original book on Combat Focus Shooting was published in 2006, and in a very few pages – 120, give or take – managed to present a very different (and in some ways very new) way of looking at defensive handgun training.

Instead of forcing contrived techniques onto a fight, techniques that might not be appropriate or even effective, CFS offered a radically different perspective: pay attention to how the body reacts to a ...

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An accident at Gunsite. Who’s at fault?

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According to AZcentral.com, a man was shot in the abdomen at Gunsite a few days ago. If you’ve seen pictures of their facility, you’ve seen the shoothouse with catwalks above which allows observation of the proceedings. Apparently a man was on the catwalk and silhouetted by overhead lights; the student saw his outline and shot it. Luckily the man survived the incident and is recovering.

Gunsite says that students are instructed not to shoot toward the catwalk, but ...

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What I did during Spring Break: a short Combat Focus Shooting Instructor Development course review.

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I just returned from a visit to Virginia Beach, where I attended the Combat Focus Shooting Instructor Development (CFSID) course. It was 4 days and just shy of 60 hours learning the ins and outs of Combat Focus Shooting so that we could accurately and efficiently communicate the program to students. It was easily the most intensive course I’ve attended in the shooting world.

We spent the first of those day on the range…no, that’s not quite right; for ...

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Another sacred cow bites the dust: Rob Pincus on shooting stances.

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I’ve often described the “shooting stance” as being like a scaffold – a device one uses to supply support and stability so that skills can be built efficiently. Past that point, the stance as usually taught has limited utility. This is largely because the circumstances under which you shoot (definitely for defensive shooting, and often in hunting as well) dictate where your feet are when you recognize the need to shoot. This has been met with not inconsiderable consternation from some ...

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The revolver is not a low-capacity autoloader. Don’t treat it like one.

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Over the years a number of 4×4 vehicles have come under fire for being “prone” to rollover accidents: the Suzuki Samurai. The Jeep CJ. The Ford Explorer. The Isuzu Trooper. While the government probes their safety and juries award inflated damages, one pertinent fact is conveniently ignored: a four-wheel-drive isn’t a family sedan, and can’t be driven like one. The results are predictable.

Guess what? The same relationship exists between the autoloader and the revolver.

In the last couple of decades, the ...

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Draw fast. Holster slow. That’s how to not shoot yourself.

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Tam alerts us to a ND that happened at a Todd Green class. In his commendable reporting of the incident, Todd says “Never be in a rush to holster your pistol. We all know it, we say it, we teach it. Not all of us do it.” So true.

As instructors it’s easy for us to forget that reinforcement, and sometimes enforcement, are necessary parts of our job. Especially when we’re dealing with “advanced” students, ...

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An exciting new personal security resource: announcing the Personal Defense Network!

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This week is dominated by SHOT Show news, and in the midst of all the shiny new goodies it’s hard to remember that self defense isn’t just about hardware. Guns and ammo are easy to write about, so that’s what most people concentrate on. As a result, you find lots of sites that deal with hardware, but precious few with the software so necessary for survival.

That situation is about to change: the Personal Defense Network has gone ...

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Massad Ayoob’s new gig: the Massad Ayoob Group (MAG).

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I got an email from Massad Ayoob recently, in which he told me about his new venture: the Massad Ayoob Group (MAG). He’s got a great website where you can read the official announcement.

While the curriculum will be new, the principles he teaches aren’t. No one knows more about the legal and ethical side of deadly force, and his updated classes will build on that expertise. I asked Mas about how the new curriculum will translate to ...

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What safety standards? Is there anything like an industry standard for firearms safety?

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On occasion I’ll get feedback on  my articles on safety, and some will opine that anyone who doesn’t teach ‘industry standard’ rules opens himself (or herself) up to liability problems. I’ve heard this argument more than once and it makes less sense each time I hear it – on several levels. I’m sure this view is quite common, so let’s tackle the subject head-on.

First let’s address the very notion that there is such a thing as an industry standard for firearm ...

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What is the true value of “dry fire”?

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A few weeks back, I took some flak for suggesting that a working knowledge of cognitive science – especially neuropsychology – was a valuable instructional tool. Such knowledge allows an instructor to better serve his/her students, and gives the students the tools they need to self-correct aberrant behaviors. Some apparently don’t believe this, or perhaps simply don’t understand why.

Some years ago I was having a specific shooting problem, one which I had a great deal of difficulty solving. During a ...

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Reality – what a concept. You’ve got to learn to recognize what it is, however.

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Yesterday, Tam asked “I laugh at the sight of the pimped tactical N-frame, too, but why?” Allow me to explain with some fuzzy dice.

Yes. You read that correctly – fuzzy dice.

If you go to a car show featuring hotrods from the ’50s and ’60s, a common sight will be a pair fuzzy dice hanging from the rearview mirror. They’re always carefully chosen to complement the paint color, and I’ve even seen fastidious owners arranging the dice “just ...

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I CAN’T HEAR YOU: the myth of auditory exclusion and hearing damage.

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A comment on last Wednesday’s article correctly reminded us that there seems to be some confusion about the phenomenon known as auditory exclusion.

Under times of high stress, such as a violent criminal attack, the body makes profound physiological adjustments to limit distracting data and focus on the threat. One of these is to radically attenuate (or even completely silence) aural inputs – in other words, it shuts your hearing down. This is called auditory exclusion.

It’s important to understand that auditory ...

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Packing your training trunk: what’s the value of prior experience in an instructor?

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There is a concept that, in order to properly teach the use of a firearm for self-defense, one must have been in a shootout. The term most often used to describe that state is “seeing the elephant.” (I’m not sure how the phrase got corrupted to mean shooting at someone, but I am sure that I find it quite annoying.)

The assertion, of course, is that only those who have drawn blood with their weapon are in a position to talk ...

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A book you need: Meditations On Violence by Rory Miller.

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Gila Hayes over at the Armed Citizens’ Legal Defense Network recently reviewed a book that I had to buy: “Meditations on Violence: A Comparison of Martial Arts Training & Real World Violence” by Rory Miller. Miller’s treatise is about violent criminal behavior – how it happens, why it happens, and what does and doesn’t work to counter it. It’s written from the perspective of empty hand martial arts (as opposed to the martial art ...

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Be honest with yourself: how good are you on demand?

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In college I minored in music performance. Being just out of high school (read: thoroughly stupid) I thought I was a hot musician, harboring dreams of becoming a professional trumpet player. Like so many other aspiring performers I really had no idea what the world of a professional musician actually entailed, but I was absolutely sure I had what it took.

One of my professors, an accomplished professional trombonist, made it his job to bring us post-adolescents into the real world. ...

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Facing my demons: how I cured an event-induced flinch.

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I used to love shooting steel. The plates dropping, the loud “clang” from a Steel Challenge target – no matter what the venue, reactive metal targets are just addicting. This addiction, I discovered, can be broken – even if you don’t want to!

A number of years back I was shooting a Steel Challenge-type match. On one stage I was watching someone else shoot when a piece of bullet jacket bounced back from the steel plate, sneaked around my safety glasses, ...

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Is that gun loaded? Why are you checking to see if it is?

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In the comments to last week’s post regarding safety rules, someone asked why checking the condition of a firearm is never listed in any rules. It seems logical enough – why not check the condition of a gun when you pick it up?

I’d like you to think about that for a minute – really think: why are you checking it?

If you plan to shoot it immediately, I can understand wanting to make certain that it was loaded. If you were ...

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Yes, I’m repeating myself: women are people, too. How about the people in the gun industry treat them like they are?

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I’ve written about this before, but it’s getting worse. All across this country are people standing behind gun counters who need to be taught that women are people, too.

I’ve lost track of the number of times I’ve run into a woman who was sold (as opposed to deciding to buy) a revolver for self defense. Now it should be pretty clear to even the densest web denizen that this ...

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Guns are not magic wands, and yours won’t always scare the bad guy off.

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There is a perception amongst a large percentage of the gun-toting public that guns are magic wands: one shot and the bad guy flies backward, landing in an unconscious heap at the bottom of a wall or tree.

Think I’m exaggerating? Spend a few minutes at a gun counter sometime. Random samples would tend to support the supposition that the majority of people carrying guns get their information from Hollywood, not Paulden.

This incident from east ...

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Following the safety rules religiously.

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In last week’s article, I mentioned that there was an ancient religious principle that can help keep you safe from firearms accidents. Allow me to digress for just a moment to give you the necessary background.

As you may know, Orthodox Jews have a rather rigorous set of rules that they follow. According to their tradition, there are 613 commandments in the Torah (their Bible, which consists of the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, ...

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The Safety Rules.

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A reader alerted me to this thread over at GlockTalk, where yet another debate about the first of Jeff Cooper’s “Four Rules of Gun Safety” is raging. Specifically, the argument centers on the allowable “exceptions” to Rule #1: “All guns are always loaded” (or, alternatively, “Treat all guns as if they were loaded.” Cooper himself said “All guns are always loaded. Even if they are not, treat them as if they are.” That comes directly from an ...

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The case for the double action only revolver.

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I endorse the practice of rendering defensive revolvers double action only (DAO.) Many people ask why, and I thought I’d give you my thoughts on the matter.

Let’s start with the usual argument for retaining single action capability, which I call the “Walter Mitty scenario”: the mythical need for making precise long range head shots. Let’s face it, folks – this just never happens in real life!

However, let’s say that you’re having a Jack Bauer kind of day ...

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