Smith & Wesson introduces two 9mm revolvers!

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Smith & Wesson has announced several new revolvers to be shown at SHOT Show, and two of them are creating some buzz on the ‘net. Why? Because they’re chambered in 9mm!
Smith & Wesson has announced several new revolvers to be shown at SHOT Show, and two of them are creating some buzz on the ‘net. Why? Because they’re chambered in 9mm!

The first is the Performance Center Model 929, which S&W spokesperson Julie Golob refers ...

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Ruger announces two new revolvers!

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Just in time for SHOT Show 2014 next month, Ruger has added a couple of new revolvers to the line.

First is a version of their 5-shot polymer revolver called the LCRx. The LCRx is, like the original LCR, chambered for the .38 Special +P. It differs from the original in having a hammer spur (the LCR has a hidden hammer, similar to the S&W ‘Centennial’ series.)

I realize they’re simply supplying market demand, and I have no doubt some ...

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Ruger Redhawk vs. Super Redhawk: what’s the difference?

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David L. asked on Facebook about the design differences between the Ruger Redhawk and the Super Redhawk. He says “I love the classic lines of the Redhawk, but the Super Redhawk completely took over. When you feel like a change of subject is in order, please consider a little “under the hood” comparison of these two revolvers.”

The Redhawk (often abbreviated ‘RH’) and Super Redhawk (herein referred to as ‘SRH’) are both large caliber double action revolvers. I’ll start with the ...

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Yet another automatic revolver: The Union.

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As you may remember, Ian at Forgotten Weapons has been chronicling the various automatic revolvers that have been made over the years. Except for the Mateba Unica, they’re generally rare (with appropriate price tags, of course.) This variant on the theme follows the trend: there were only 300 Union Automatic Revolvers made. Of those 300 it’s hard to know how many survived. In fact, it’s hard to know if all 300 actually made it to market!

The gun was designed by ...

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It’s official: Defensive Revolver Fundamentals has been released!

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DRF book cover_small

My latest book, Defensive Revolver Fundamentals, officially launched yesterday! The Outdoor Wire carried the press release, saying “In his new book, Defensive Revolver Fundamentals, Cunningham makes an informed and convincing case for the revolver as a personal defense firearm.”

This is the book I’ve wanted to write for some time. It distills everything I’ve learned about defensive shooting up to this point, focusing ...

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Some people should stick to Glocks: a review of a bad review.

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In the September issue of SWAT Magazine is a review of the Wiley Clapp special edition Ruger GP100. I’ve mentioned this gun previously; it’s a mix of some good things, some mediocre things, and a surprising omission or two. Overall it’s a nice treatment of the old warhorse, and I’m glad to see attention being paid to something other than hunting revolvers at Ruger.

It’s this article that I find a little odd. Written by Todd Burgreen, it’s your typical gun ...

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Another automatic revolver – and boy, is this one weird!

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Ian at Forgotten Weapons has done it again! This time he’s got the scoop on the oddest revolver ever made: the Norwegian Landstad Model 1900.

I won’t steal his thunder by saying any more, but will instead urge you to click on the link and read his article. It’s like going to the freak show: you can’t believe such a thing exists, but you can’t stop staring in morbid fascination!

-=[ Grant ]=-

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Even I learn something now and again: an odd automatic revolver!

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an over at Forgotten Weapons has done it again: come up with a gun I didn’t know existed. In this case, it’s a revolver I’d never heard of.

He recently posted a picture of the three commonly known automatic revolvers – that is, revolvers that rotate the cylinder and cock the hammer after every shot, as opposed to having the shooter’s trigger finger do that work. Most people have heard of the Mateba Unica, or the Webley-Fosberry, but ...

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A revolver from Savage?

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I’ll admit to occasionally being surprised, but when I saw a headline over at Forgotten Weapons about a Savage revolver, I scratched my head just a little. I couldn’t recall any revolver made by Savage; autoloaders yes, and of course rifles, but a revolver?

Turns out that the Savage Model 101 isn’t really a revolver at all; it just looks like one. The ‘cylinder’ is fixed to the barrel, and the entire assembly pivots out from the frame ...

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Two new revolver holsters from Crossbreed and DeSantis.

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I’m always looking for good revolver holsters. It seems we get the short end of the stick from everyone! This week, however, there are a couple of new holsters I’d like to bring to your attention, as they both offer something unique.

The first is the DeSantis Ammo Nemesis. It’s a synthetic pocket holster for a small revolver (J-frame, possibly a Detective Special.) The outside of the holster has a very grippy rubber covering, which should help keep ...

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How subjects in the UK get around their draconian gun laws.

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As you may know, the United Kingdom banned possession of handguns for the general populace some time back. This action was precipitated by a spree killing at a school in Scotland, and in an incredibly strong knee-jerk reaction the UK simply declared handguns to be illegal. Confiscation and destruction followed; the loss of many historical artifacts resulted.

The law exempts muzzle-loading handguns, however, and so some enterprising souls convert double-action revolvers into muzzleloaders. The Firearms Blog has the ...

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A BIG revolver. Sorta. But who’s going to argue with a Gatling gun?

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As I mentioned in my SHOT Show 2013 recap, I ran into Ian from Forgotten Weapons at the show. We only talked for a very brief time, but he mentioned that he was putting up a “revolver” video just for me – and then laughed.

No wonder! The video in question is him firing one of the Colt 1877 Bulldog Gatling Gun reproductions (which I covered in my SHOT Show 2012 report last year!) Neat video, neat gun, ...

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Back from SHOT Show 2013, Part Two: Gear.

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I don’t really go to SHOT to look at gear, but on Friday I had the whole day to get out and look at stuff. Prior to that I only saw gear on a “hit and miss” basis as I ran between appointments and meetings. Here’s what I managed to see:

– The first thing I have to report (and the most exciting for revolver enthusiasts) is that Korth, the top-tier German revolver maker, is looking for a ...

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Revolver malfunctions, Part Four: design and engineering issues.

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Very often an autoloader fails to function as a result of design. The reciprocation of the slide is governed by a combination of spring pressure, cartridge power, and system friction. The parameters inside which that system operates are actually pretty narrow, and it’s a testament to both design and care of manufacture that today’s modern autoloading pistols work as well as they do – which is to say, generally very well. Short of a non-externally-caused catastrophic parts failure (which is ...

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Revolver malfunctions, Part Three – user induced problems.

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There are really only two “malfunctions” that can be attributed to shooter technique, and they’re both easily avoided.

The first is a failure to properly reset the trigger. This is especially common with autoloader shooters who pick up a Ruger revolver: used to resetting the trigger until they hear or feel a “click”, they do the same on their revolver and…the trigger locks up! The trigger won’t compress until it’s allowed to travel all the way forward, to its rest position, ...

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Revolver malfunctions, Part Two: maintenance-induced failures.

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In the first installment we looked at revolver malfunctions caused by ammunition. (I’ve edited that entry to consider dirty ammunition, which can also cause stoppages. I recommend that you go back and re-read it for that discussion.) It’s important to note that ammunition failures are not the fault of the revolver and they’re not unique to the revolver (they happen to autoloaders too.) They do, however, account for the majority of revolver failures and thus must be understood and dealt ...

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Revolver malfunctions, Part One: ammunition issues.

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I received an email last week, a sort of complaint that I don’t write much about revolvers any longer. Well, I wrote an entire book – isn’t that enough?? OK, OK, you win – let’s talk about revolver malfunctions.

I’ve mentioned before, in more than one venue, that the revolver typically will have a longer mean time between failure than an autoloader (we’re talking unique failures, which automatically discounts those due to ammunition problems – which can affect either platform equally.)

The ...

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Apparently they’re looking at the pictures. Of revolvers, of course!

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One of the most common compliments I get about my Gun Digest Book Of The Revolver regards the pictures. People tell me that they appreciate the photography, and I’m happy that they noticed – I went to a lot of effort to make sure that the photos supported the text, that the reader could look at them and get the point easily. Apparently, the goal was met!

My publisher, Gun Digest Books, was so taken with them that ...

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The bullet jump controversy: Specials in Magnum chambers.

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I got an email recently from a reader who asked about .38 Special accuracy when fired in a .357-length chamber. There is, as he noted, a lot of speculation on the topic: some saying they’re less accurate, some saying it doesn’t matter, and others saying that there is no way we’ll ever know for sure.

I’m not at all convinced about that last one, but the first two opinions are both correct – under some circumstances. Some years ago I experimented ...

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Book reports: two reviews of my Gun Digest Book Of The Revolver!

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I got two very nice compliments on my book (the Gun Digest Book Of The Revolver, in case you’re just tuning in) this week.

The first was from a lady who chose a revolver for her own personal defense needs, and was pleasantly surprised to find that my book helped her learn how to handle her gun when her auto-shooting CHL instructors fell short. She said some very kind things in her email, and I’m glad that the ...

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Moore’s Patent Revolver.

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Not sure how I found this civil war blog (Uncle? Tam? Someone else?), but it has a great article on Moore’s Patent Revolver – the first revolver with a swing-out cylinder (though not quite of the kind we’re used to.)

It’s also interesting in that it was one of the many guns which violated Rollin White’s bored-through cylinder patent. History buffs may recall that White was a Colt employee who first presented his idea to allow a revolver ...

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Monday Meanderings: hi-cap revolvers, Rhode’s life, and I’m no anglophile.

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– Not sure where I got this, but it’s pretty interesting: a three-barrel revolver. What will people think of next?!? (<–that’s humor, people.)

– Seems that Kim Rhode, ace Olympic shotgunner and ambassador for the shooting sports, has a blog. Hope she finds time to post more often. (Who knew she was a fan of bacon-wrapped meatloaf?)

– Speaking of Kim: I’m still a little miffed that they removed her original event – women’s double trap ...

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Ed Harris Friday: Blackpowder Revolvers

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(Editor’s Note: I’ll admit to knowing nothing about blackpowder arms, so this article from Ed was quite enlightening! If you’ve thought about getting a cap-and-ball revolver but weren’t sure about how to use it, Ed’s article will tell you everything you need to know!)

Handling Cap & Ball Revolvers
By C.E. “Ed” Harris

Learning to shoot a cap & ball revolver requires common sense and attention to detail, but these guns are effective and satisfying. Safety, reliability and accuracy of a black ...

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A Gallic Wednesday: French ordnance revolvers.

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The Forgotten Weapons Blog has a great video about the two most common French Ordnance revolvers: the Models 1873 and 1892. I know, I know, they’re French – but you have to remember that at one time France was a major military power and arms innovator in their own right.

(Never heard of the Model 1897 75mm cannon, an artillery piece so advanced that they justifiably considered it to be a state secret? Or the ...

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I still think a .410 revolver is silly.

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I think I’ve made my feelings clear regarding the concept (if not the execution) of the Taurus Judge/S&W Governor revolvers. As self defense guns, which is how they’re marketed, they make no sense for a wide variety of valid reasons. What’s amazing to me is that people will say “that’s all true, but I think they still have a place for snakes and carjackers.”

I’ve talked about the former already. A large portion of my family lives and ...

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Finishing an experiment with pocket carry. Maybe.

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Early last year I embarked on something of an experiment: carrying my gun not on my belt, as I’ve done for more years than I can remember, but in my front pocket. Exclusively.

I’ve carried in a pocket holster from time to time, usually when wearing a suit, so I’m not at all unfamiliar with the concept. I’ve never done so as my default method, and I wanted to see what it was like. What kinds of problems would I encounter?

My ...

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Another great review of my book: the Gun Digest Book Of The Revolver!

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Gila Hayes over at the Armed Citizen Legal Defense Network (ACLDN) just posted a very nice review of The Gun Digest Book Of The Revolver in their monthly journal. (In the interest of full disclosure, Gila is both a friend and the person who introduced me to my publisher. She is also known for her scrupulously ethical writing, which makes me doubly proud of her review.)

For those waiting for my book to come to the iPad, the ...

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