Picking up the pieces, post RECOIL.

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RECOIL Magazine took a beating last week. The editor, Jerry Tsai, resigned on Thursday after a long list of advertisers cancelled their support of the publication, and on Friday the publisher “suspended” Associate Publisher Joe Galloway – likely for his ridiculous spin attempts (and perhaps some alleged astroturfing that was tried on Facebook.)

Now what? They may survive, they may not; I don’t think anyone can really predict their fate, at least not now. If they want to survive, however, the first thing they’re going to need to do is to appoint a new editor who is both a young iconoclast AND a knowledgable defender of gun rights. It will need to be someone who the 20- and 30-something readers of RECOIL can accept as one of their own, someone who knows (and is known in) the industry, and someone who can retain the talent that actually put the magazine out. That’s a tall order.

The publisher is going to need to come out with a strong commitment to the Second Amendment. Not a tepid, “we stand in full support” kind of statement that politicians everywhere spout, but a real, here-is-exactly-what-we-think-about-the-tough-issues statement. He’s also going to need to come to grips with the internet and social media, which the whole affair (delayed statements, flip-flopping, alleged astroturfing, and leaked internal emails) showed not to be the case. They’re a print entity and it seems they didn’t quite understand how quickly things move in the electronic world, let alone how easy it is for people to find out if someone is lying.

Once those things are done the magazine is going to need to rebuild its advertising base. That’s going to be a tough row to hoe, because the advertisers have been burned and are probably quite shy of any association. This is where the new editor is going to have to press the flesh and make the personal appeals necessary to woo those companies back into their pages. Any whiff of insincerity or suggestion of hesitation on their new mission, and those ad dollars will leave for good.

As a community we’re going to need to support those advertisers if and when they return to RECOIL. A continued boycott won’t do any of us any good, least of all the under-represented shooters for whom RECOIL was intended. It’s time to put down the pitchforks, folks, and get busy putting RECOIL back on the newsstands – assuming, of course, they show that they’re deserving of that support. The community will need to be both immediate and visible so that the advertisers understand they won’t be penalized for going back to RECOIL.

Why? Because, as I’ve already pointed out in this blog and on The Gun Nation, the magazine is important to the shooting community’s future.

The industry is just now getting their heads wrapped around the very place of RECOIL in the panoply of firearms publications. I don’t think many people in the business yet “get” the purpose of the magazine (the online criticisms of their content are painfully hilarious to read), and very few consumers outside of their target market understand the new gun enthusiasts themselves.

As the story unfolded I wondered aloud about their political connections and ownership. I had the facts correct, but my concerns, I think, proved to be misplaced. It became very clear as the ship started listing to starboard that the magazine existed not as a tool of subtle political manipulation, but simply as an example of how people’s interests are not always going to be in line with our preconceived notions.

This weekend, for instance, I was listening to a gun talk show and the host couldn’t understand how someone could be both an enthusiastic gun owner and in favor of gay marriage. (Apparently he is not aware that there is a significant, yet quiet, subset of gay gun owners whose passion for gun rights easily equals his.) These young shooters very often are supportive of both concepts, and it’s something those people in leadership positions who see the political spectrum in black-and-white must face up to.

Here’s the key to understanding the RECOIL reader: they are not one-issue people or one-issue voters; they are not gun rights activists first and foremost, whose points of view are shaped by that. And, though it may cost me some readers, I’m going to say for the record: THAT’S OK!

They don’t have to be rabid gun rights activists to support the Second Amendment. They simply need to be educated as to what the Amendment means, why it’s important to them, and how it is perfectly compatible with their desires for “social justice”. We are not going to turn them into “conservative” voters, we’re not going to stop them from voting the way they want to vote, and it would be hypocritical of us to try to do so or to abandon them because they won’t. We have to accept that they’re not going to vote gun rights exclusively, that they’ll consider them as one part of their whole world view, and that they’re often going to support candidates who sport a “D” after their name.

If we as a community are serious – really serious – about broadening the support for firearms ownership in this country and ensuring the continuation of all that we’ve fought for, we have to accept the RECOIL readers for who they are. Our job is to move the Second Amendment up on their scale of importance, but we can’t do that if we can’t reach them. RECOIL was one very good way of reaching them.

There is a whole generation out there whose members like guns and would likely become the Second Amendment leaders of tomorrow, as long as we don’t leave them blaming the “fudds” for taking away their voice. By taking an active interest in what happens over at RECOIL, we can ensure that there is a real outlet for those gun owners who are not well served (if served at all) by the existing publications and organizations.

-=[ Grant ]=-

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About the Author:

Grant Cunningham is a renowned author and teacher in the fields of self defense, defensive shooting education and personal safety. He’s written several popular books on handguns and defensive shooting, including "The Book of the Revolver", "Shooter’s Guide To Handguns", "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals", "Defensive Pistol Fundamentals", and "Practice Strategies for Defensive Shooting" (Fall 2015.) Grant has also written articles on shooting, self defense, training and teaching for many magazines and shooting websites, including Concealed Carry Magazine, Gun Digest Magazine, the Association of Defensive Shooting Instructors ADSI) and the popular Personal Defense Network training website. He’s produced a DVD in the National Rifle Association’s Personal Firearm Defense series titled "Defensive Revolver Fundamentals" and teaches defensive shooting and personal safety courses all over the United States.
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